Skip to content


Mine Sweeper

US soldier searching for mines along a riverbank near Chinju. The mine detector is an SCR 625. September 1950.

Image # 0794

Image # 0794

For bibliography purposes, these images can be cited:

Image #—, “US Army Photo collection, C-E Museum Acquisition” from the CECOM Historical Office archive, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD.

Make sure to double-check your style guide for the appropriate method of citation for your work. Need a higher resolution version of this same photo? Leave us a comment below or click on our contact page above, and reference the image number. Each of the scanned originals is approximately 2-11 MB.

Posted in Photo Series.

Tagged with , , , , , , .

Read Comments


Flying Flags

United Nations Flag Display in Myer Park. 12 September 1949.

Image # 0522

Image # 0522

For bibliography purposes, these images can be cited:

Image #—, “US Army Photo collection, C-E Museum Acquisition” from the CECOM Historical Office archive, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD.

Make sure to double-check your style guide for the appropriate method of citation for your work. Need a higher resolution version of this same photo? Leave us a comment below or click on our contact page above, and reference the image number. Each of the scanned originals is approximately 2-11 MB.

Posted in Photo Series.

Tagged with , , , , , .

Read Comments


Portrait of the Officer as a Young Man

BG George Gibbs, 1920.

Image # 0518

Image # 0518

For bibliography purposes, these images can be cited:

Image #—, “US Army Photo collection, C-E Museum Acquisition” from the CECOM Historical Office archive, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD.

Make sure to double-check your style guide for the appropriate method of citation for your work. Need a higher resolution version of this same photo? Leave us a comment below or click on our contact page above, and reference the image number. Each of the scanned originals is approximately 2-11 MB.

Posted in Photo Series.

Tagged with , , , , , , , .

Read Comments


From the desk of the Good Idea Fairy

I just cannot imagine having a dedicated Cyber Command separate from the other services. What do you think, readers?

http://www.usni.org/magazines/proceedings/2014-01/time-us-cyber-force

To me, the authors’ arguement comparing aviation in WWI and cybermission in 2014 is faulty. They really are very different scenarios. The idea of having the Army Air Corps and the aviation bundled together with the US Army Signal Corps was not exactly a political masterminded sort of maneuver, either.  It came at a time when (1) the Signal Corps was sort of a miscellaneous catch-all for technical programs* and (2) the leaders of the Signal Corps were some pretty brilliant dudes. Adolphus Greely and George Owen Squier led the way for aviation in the Army because they happened to be in the Army. If either, or both, of those men were in the Navy, I have no doubt that the Navy would have been in charge of military aviation during WWI. Heck, Squier was simultaneously the Chief Signal Officer and the Chief Aviation Officer. He was an officer as well as a doctor of engineering from Johns Hopkins. In the later years, maybe there was politics and empire building, but at the beginning it unfolded as it did because it wasn’t happening anywhere else. As it was, the US was already a few years behind Europe in developing aircraft for military use.

It also is sort of weird to think of the development of cybersecurity as being analagous to the creation of military aircraft, possibly because we don’t think of writing computer code the same way we think about flying a plane. At the same time, there’s not just one quartermaster department that services the entire military or one infantry or one special operations group. Had the authors pitched the idea of a Joint Cybercommand, made up of individuals from all the services, I think I would have supported that concept as more realistic than a breakaway group that services the entire military. Because if they are servicing the military, why couldn’t they also service the Department of Energy and the Department of Homeland Security and the Department of State, all of whom have their own cybersecurity needs? If you’re already creating a “new” standalone service, why not really go for it and provide that service for the entire federal government.

* Think radar, the weather service, still photography, motion picture photography, lab-created crystals, FM radio, etc.

Posted in History Happenings.

Tagged with , , , , , , , , , , , , .

Read Comments


Farenheit 451

Arhcive photo of Fort Monmouth, Fire Department. 1920.

Image # 0517

Image # 0517

For bibliography purposes, these images can be cited:

Image #—, “US Army Photo collection, C-E Museum Acquisition” from the CECOM Historical Office archive, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD.

Make sure to double-check your style guide for the appropriate method of citation for your work. Need a higher resolution version of this same photo? Leave us a comment below or click on our contact page above, and reference the image number. Each of the scanned originals is approximately 2-11 MB.

Posted in Photo Series.

Tagged with , , , , , .

Read Comments


Collegiate Gothic?

Telephone Exchange, Administration Building, Fort Riley, Kansas. Connecting Guard and control

Image # 0481

Image # 0481

For bibliography purposes, these images can be cited:

Image #—, “US Army Photo collection, C-E Museum Acquisition” from the CECOM Historical Office archive, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD.

Make sure to double-check your style guide for the appropriate method of citation for your work. Need a higher resolution version of this same photo? Leave us a comment below or click on our contact page above, and reference the image number. Each of the scanned originals is approximately 2-11 MB.

Posted in Photo Series.

Tagged with , , , , , , .

Read Comments


Radio Set SCR-193

This image is of the components of Radio Set SCR-193-( ) a WWII era radio set. The image is dated June 1942. The radio was a product of the Signal Corps General Development Laboratory, a predecessor component of CECOM and Team C4ISR. Information on the photograph indicates that this radio was used in medium tank M4A3.

Components of SCR-193

Components of SCR-193

Note: This series written by Floyd, and edited/posted by Chrissie.

Posted in From the Archives.

Tagged with , , , , , , .

Read Comments


Happy New Year from the Officers’ Club

Happy New Year and first workday of 2014! Officers’ Club interior, c. 1950

Image # 0468

Image # 0468

For bibliography purposes, these images can be cited:

Image #—, “US Army Photo collection, C-E Museum Acquisition” from the CECOM Historical Office archive, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD.

Make sure to double-check your style guide for the appropriate method of citation for your work. Need a higher resolution version of this same photo? Leave us a comment below or click on our contact page above, and reference the image number. Each of the scanned originals is approximately 2-11 MB.

Posted in Photo Series.

Tagged with , , , , , , , .

Read Comments


Radio Set SCR-193-( )

The CECOM Historical Office maintains an extensive collection of photographic related materials that includes images as negatives, photographs, slides, and digitally scanned files.

 In 2011, with the closure of Fort Monmouth that was once the home of CECOM the numbers of materials included in this collection was increased in proportions never imagined by the Historical Office.  Included were thousands of images that had been maintained at the Communications-Electronics Museum and a collection of 10s of thousands of negatives and digital images maintained by photographic contractor.  The Historical Office has been in the process of indexing and absorbing these materials into the existing collections.

 This series of blogs will feature some recently discovered digitally scanned images that come from the museum collection.

 

Radio Set SCR-193 (  )

Radio Set SCR-193 ( )

 

This image is of the components of Radio Set SCR-193-(  ), a WWII era radio set.  The image is dated June 1942.  The radio was a product of the Signal Corps General Development Laboratory, a predecessor component of CECOM and Team C4ISR.  Information on the photograph indicates that this radio was used in medium tank M4A3.

Note: This series written by Floyd, and edited/posted by Chrissie.

Posted in From the Archives.

Tagged with , , , , , , , , .

Read Comments


Apex – Distinguished Pigeon

Apex, a veteran of WWII was designated as a Hero Pigeon. His identification number was 873 USA 42 (4th CA). This courageous and speedy male blue-check pigeon, he was hatched in Burma in 1944.

Apex earned his place as a hero pigeon for his successful completion of over twenty important combat missions in the India-Burma area of war operations. All agents of the Office of Strategic Services assigned to this area of operation parachuted behind enemy lines, and would be carrying pigeons. Frequently these pigeons were the only means of contact between the agents and their headquarters. Apex soon won recognition for his ability to “get the message through” despite most hazardous conditions.

Apex

Apex

After WWII he was rewarded by being housed in the Churchill Loft, the Army’s “Pigeon Hall of Fame”, at Fort Monmouth, New Jersey.

When the Pigeon Program was discontinued in 1957, APEX was sent to the Baltimore Zoo in Druid Hill Park, Maryland along with Yank, and other Hero Pigeon. Apex passed away in October 1957.

Note: This entry composed by Floyd, and edited/posted by Chrissie.

Posted in Pigeons.

Tagged with , , , , , , , , .

Read Comments