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Fallout Boy

These photos are all from August 1946.  The captions below each image are from the original photographs.  I find them creepy and fascinating at the same time.  A few years ago, during a military history class, I did a semester project on the impact of atomic and incendiary bombs on the food supply in Japan.  It was extremely depressing, but I learned a lot about how atomic particles move through ecosystems.  On land, they’re contained more or less.  In water – like the Bikini Islands where the photos below were taken – it’s a totally different story.  The particles spread throughout the entire ocean through currents and biomagnification (when particles get increasingly concentrated as they move up the food chain).  That is kind of creepy, too.

Image #5590

Image #5590

5590 – What Goes Up Must Come Down- Tons of water thrown up out of Bikini Lagoon by the Baker Day blast shower down on the Crossroads target fleet. The spreading circle of radio active materials is shown sweeping out in an ever widening ring over the target ships. This photograph was taken by an automatic camera mounted in one of the Bikini towers.

Image # 5591

Image # 5591

5591 – No Toy Balloon- At the instant the serial camera recorded this photograph of the Baker Day explosion, water, steam and radio active substances released in the blast were boiling skyward like a huge toy balloon. This photograph was taken from a plane that was almost directly overhead at the instant of detonation.

Image # 5592

Image # 5592

5592 – Atomic Cloud Shrouds Target Fleet- Sweeping out in all directions, this haze of water, steam spray and radio active substances obscured all but extreme outer fringes of the Crossroads target fleet a few minutes after the Baker Day blast. This photograph was taken by an automatic camera mounted in one of the photographic towers on a nearby island.

Image # 5593

Image # 5593

5593 – It Flies Through The Air With the Greatest Of Heat- The atom bomb burst, in its test of the fleet. Looking for all the world like a giant cauliflower head suspended to an ever-stretching neck, Bikini’s billowing cloud of smoke and flame was caught in various states of formation by a Navy patrol bomber flying just beyond range of the deadly explosion. These pictures were taken within several minutes of the detonation and represent the first series of aerial views to be flown to the United States for publication.

Image # 5594

Image # 5594

5594 – Atomic Fireball As Seen From The Air- Here is the camera record of the evolution of the atomic fireball, beginning micro-seconds after the detonation of the atomic bomb over Bikini Lagoon July 1, 1946 with the man made light of a thousand suns and ending with the formation of the atomic cloud. The series of eight pictures were taken by an electronically operated serial camera miles away from the blast.

Image # 5595

Image # 5595

5595 – From the air, the Baker Day atomic explosion took the appearance of a derby hat for a brief instant as water, spray and steam boiled skyward out of Bikini Lagoon.

Image # 5596

Image # 5596

5596 – Radio Activity Above the Clouds-To observers the atomic mushroom of the Able Day explosion over Bikini Lagoon looked like a giant peach ice cream cone. This photograph taken from a Crossroads photo plane, shows the radio active cloud still boiling up toward its maximum height of approximately 35,000 feet. Note the shock wave circle sweeping out around the lagoon.

Image # 5597

Image # 5597

5597 – First Picture of Atomic Shock Wave-A few seconds after the Able Day bomb explodes, at Bikini, a camera in a tower on the atoll records the atomic pressure wave as a visible black band moving outward from the explosion center. Fires can be seen aboard several ships of the target fleet.

Image # 5599

Image # 5599

5599 – Rising column of water enters the first phase of characteristic mushroom. At the base of the column of water, in left foreground is cruiser Salt Lake City, in right foreground is Japanese battleship Nagato

 

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